Posts Tagged ‘londonistan’

This is a piece that I have been cogitating about for a while, trying to find out more information about the chap. Unfortunately, most of it is in Somali, a language I confess to not understand. Nevertheless, he struck me as interesting given his history as a Somali leader who had lived until relatively recently in London only to then reappear alongside the al Shabaab leadership at their event in May this year in honour of Osama bin Laden’s death. Luckily, I was able to connect with AR of the excellent Somali War Monitor site who was able to help me find some more sources and the two of us pulled this short bio of Abdulcaadir together. The actual article is unfortunately behind a firewall, so I cannot simply post it here. But in the meantime, here is a hint.

A Profile of Sheikh Abdulcaadir Mumin: Al-Shabaab’s Leading Guide

Publication: Volume: 2 Issue: 11

November 30, 2011 01:37 PM Age: 22 hrs

By: Raffaello Pantucci and A.R. Sayyid

Sheikh Abdulcaadir Mumin

The appearance of Sheikh Abdulcaadir Mumin, alongside al-Shabaab’s senior leadership, in May 2011 at the group’s official press conference acknowledging Osama bin Laden’s death was something of a coming out for Mumin. Largely unknown outside the Somali-speaking community, he has until now lurked in the background of overtly radical Somali circles. Previously a prominent feature on the London Somali scene, Mumin, first appointed as the head of propagation for the Banaadir administrative region and its capital Mogadishu, appears at present to have risen into a senior position as one of al-Shabaab’s key theological guides.

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I have a couple of book reviews in the latest Terrorism and Political Violence journal. They seem to enjoy my reviews and I greatly enjoy reading, especially for a purpose like this. I have a few more in the pipeline. This first one looks at a book published in the UK called “Ricin!” by the former jury foreman and a journalist which focuses on the disrupted ricin plot from 2003. It was a very useful book from the perspective of understanding a specific plot better, though parts of its conclusions seem a little skewed. Some interesting insights into the Algerian community in London and the legal contortions that had to be gone into in this case. It also gives detail on the information that the Algerians passed on to the Brits when they picked up one of the Algerians who had run away from the UK. Quite a messy pile of intel by the looks of it and none of which was obtained using polite questions.

Unfortunately, the review can only be found behind a firewall here. I am asking the publisher if I can place it here, but in the meantime feel free to write if you are specifically interested.